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Analyze Text Passages(Primary and Secondary Sources)_DBQ

Description 

How can you analyze text passages?
Comprehend and analyze the text passages.

 

Time To Complete 

1-2 hours

Common Core Standards 

  • CCRA.R.1
  • CCRA.R.2
  • CCRA.R.6

I Can Statements 

  • I can:
    • Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events through comparisons, analogies, or categories. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.3)
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.4)
    • Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.5)
    • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.6)
    • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.7)
    • Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.8)
    • Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.9)
  • I will know my analysis of texts is of high quality when it:
    • Makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events
    • Analyzes the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone
    • Explains the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept
    • States the author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyzes how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints
    • Evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of using the author’s chosen medium (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea
    • Delineates and evaluates the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identifies irrelevant evidence
    • Identifies where the different texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation

Suggestions for Assessing Student Readiness to Move Forward:

  • Confer with students, asking probing questions about their analysis to gauge how well it meets the quality criteria.
  • Ask students to self-evaluate their work after completing one of the activities below.
Possible Activities 
  1. Provide a mixture of primary and secondary sources and have students evaluate each source in relation to the task. Which is the best source to help students accomplish the task? 

  2. Have students read the text through the lens of determining importance. Model through a think-aloud how you decide what information is important, what is relevant or irrelevant. This could be through annotating the texts.  http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson1132/AnnotationGuide.pdf

  3. When analyzing primary sources, it is important for students to think about the context of the time period of the source. One can analyze historical documents for language usage, tone, and structure based on the time period. This exposes students to different styles and helps them become more familiar with older documents. 

  4. Activating prior knowledge is also important when analyzing documents. Students need to be able to put the document in a context. Model this with students by looking at a satirical pop culture news story from The Onion (http://www.theonion.com/). Have students work in pairs to read a story and come up with a list of necessary prior knowledge the reader would need in order to get the joke. Then transition to documents related to your assignment. Multiple ideas for activating prior knowledge can be found here: http://www.thinkport.org/career/strategies/reading/activate.tp

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