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Apply Visual Thinking Techniques

Description 

What is visualization?

Students connect personal experience to learning explorations and demonstrate various techniques for responding to and summarizing a variety of visual media and text sources.

Time To Complete 

2+ Hours

Content Areas 

  • ELA
  • Math
  • Science
  • Social Studies

Learning Strands 

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing

I Can Statements 

  • Identify details or main ideas in the resources and personally connect individual experiences and knowledge to the visual media and texts.
  • Identify details or main ideas in the resources that connect to other visual media and texts and the larger world.
  • Accurately summarize and synthesize a variety of visual media and text sources to exhibit understanding of a topic or issue.
  • Asking myself questions linking personal life to the resource, (e.g. Why is this important to me? How is this like something from my life? How is this different form something in my life? What were my feelings when I explored this resource?) and honestly discussing successes, failures, challenges, and opportunities for growth.

I will know my visual thinking is high quality when:  It expresses what I see in my imagination or mind's eye, combining visuals/imagery and text to communicate

 

Suggestions for Assessing Student Readiness to Move Forward:

  • Confer with students to check their understanding visual thinking
  • Ask students to self-evaluate their work after completing one of the activities below
Possible Activities 
  1. Photo Analysis​: This advance organizer helps students develop a procedure for looking closely at a photograph.

  2. Cartoon Analysis:​ This advance organizer helps students develop a procedure for looking closely at a cartoon.

  3. Reflective Summaries​: As noted above, the Visual Journal can be used as a stand-alone performance task, and it can also be complemented with elements of the Reflective Summaries performance task, which explicitly teaches students to use additional literacy strategies to respond to texts.

    Teacher Notes:

    Using think alouds is vital to distinguish between teaching students to visualize and merely asking them to do show. Share what goes on in your mind to generate visualizations. It might be keeping an open mind, making connections, seeing colors and shapes. Be sure to have students share their own metacognition as well.

Downloadable Resources 
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