Home > Our Design Lab > Skills > Memory Development

Memory Development

Description 

In order for learning to be useful, students need to do more than understand the information initially; they need to remember it later on. This concept sounds simple but is more complex than it seems, since memory itself is complex and multifaceted. There are at least two distinct types of memory, semantic (memory for facts) and episodic (memory for experiences). The process of memory includes at least two distinct phases: storage (creating memory) and retrieval (calling forth memory). Students are expected to remember and use an enormous amount of information, and in order to do so they generally need explicit instruction and practice in strategies related to both memory storage and memory retrieval.

Benefits 

By learning and practicing strategies for more efficient memorizing, students learn to process and use the large amounts of information they are faced with in high school, college, and beyond. They can become more efficient at studying, and more effective at learning in all contexts.

Content Area Adaptations 

Memory development is equally relevant in all content areas, since all subjects require students to commit information to memory.

Learning Strategies 

  • Connecting
  • Determining Importance
  • Inferring
  • Metacognition
  • Questioning
  • Synthesizing
  • Visualizing

Common Core Standards 

  • CCRA.R.1
  • CCRA.R.2
  • CCRA.R.3
  • CCRA.R.4
  • CCRA.R.5
  • CCRA.R.7
  • CCRA.R.8
  • CCRA.R.9
  • CCRA.W.1

Content Areas 

  • ELA
  • Math
  • Science
  • Social Studies

Learning Strands 

  • Reading
  • Writing

Loci Mnemonics

Through this activity students create an association with familiar physical locations to assist in remembering a process, list, or set of facts. This process develops students’ metacognition, and helps them to become more mindful and effective in their studying

Lesson Plan Stages 

  • Investigation
  • Reflection

Rhyme Mnemonics

Through this activity students create short rhymes to assist in remembering a concept, process, or set of facts. This process develops students’ metacognition, and helps them to become more mindful and effective in their studying.

Lesson Plan Stages 

  • Investigation
  • Reflection

Storyboard Your Visualizations

In this activity, students will create drawings that represent their five senses based on what they have read. The purpose of this activity is for readers to experience the text by using their senses to put them inside the text. This can help students to engage with the text on a new level, improve comprehension, and trigger memory. A simple...

Lesson Plan Stages 

  • Investigation
  • Reflection
  • Synthesis