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Text-Self / Text-Text / Text-World Connections

Description 

Skilled readers and learners are constantly making connections: they recognize the interrelated nature of knowledge and actively note themes and similarities as they emerge. Students can learn how to make effective connections, and how to group these connections into three categories. Text-to-self connections relate ideas learned in a text with a student’s own experiences or ideas. Text-to-text connections are recurringwords or ideas within a book. Finally, text-to-world connections are links between ideas in a text and other domains of knowledge.

Benefits 

Making connections helps students to deepen their learning by appreciating the ways in which knowledge is interrelated and multifaceted. By developing broad networks of associations around individual concepts, students increase their ability to retain and retrieve information. Beyond the general benefits of making connections, each individual type of connection has its own unique benefits. Text-to-self connections help students to engage emotionally with a text, to relate to characters, and to enrich their conception of story details. Text-to-text connections help students to identify themes and main ideas, and to notice characteristics of an author’s writing style or commonalities of writing in general across authors. Finally, text-to-world connections help students to activate relevant background knowledge to inform their understanding of the text, and to expand their appreciation of domains of interconnected knowledge.

Learning Strategies 

  • Inferring

Connect Two

In this activity students will make connections between concepts/terms. The purpose of this activity is to help students better understand concepts and how they relate to each other. This activity is best used as a review of key vocabulary.

Lesson Plan Stages 

  • Reflection
  • Synthesis

Narrative Text Structure

All readers are better able to understand texts that are familiar to them, both in form and in content. However, many students struggle to identify the various structures that text can take, and they are unable to use a familiar form to provide context for learning. Narrative structure has unique features and conventions, and students can learn...

Lesson Plan Stages 

  • Investigation
  • Launching Into New Content

Newspaper Connection

In this activity, inspired by Burke’s The English Teacher’s Companion (1998), students will bring in articles (newspaper, magazine, blog posts) that relate to issues or ideas in the unit of study. Students will work in groups to compare and contrast their articles. The purpose of this activity is to push students to examine content in greater...

Lesson Plan Stages 

  • Reflection
  • Synthesis